Tag Archives: Accendo Markets

The oil price recovery is unlikely to last

This week, Mike van Dulken from Accendo Markets tells Hot Commodity why hopes of a continued oil price recovery are premature…

There has been much talk about the remarkable recovery in the price of oil to $41/barrel and whether it is sustainable. After 50 per cent gains since January’s 13-year lows are we set to push on or retrace? Debate continues as to whether Opec and Russia can cobble together some sort of production freeze agreement. Not in our opinion. Not while Iran and Iraq are in full recovery mode. Can anyone trust anyone, given the hole they have dug themselves in the fight with US newcomers for market share?

This keeps the global supply glut overhang very much in play and risks worsening as prices approach $45 where some nimble US shale frackers – now the oil market’s swing producers – have suggested they would consider returning to idle rigs to pump at the more economically viable price. Which would of course add to the supply glut and thus give us a $45 ceiling to accompany the recent $28 floor.

However, there has been little focus on the narrowing of the spread between the two crude oil benchmarks over the last few weeks to the point they are now just a few cents apart. With US Crude +52 per cent versus Brent Crude +48 per cent we could assume that US Crude has overshot and may be due a drop back below $40. For a long time, US Crude traded at a significant discount to Brent, driven by a sharp rise in US shale production over the last half decade and Brent incorporating more transport costs. However, there are reasons why the spread should have evaporated of late, even testing positive in December. The US has lifted its export ban. North Sea production has actually picked in the face of declining US shale production. Bearish market bets on oil have been unwinding sharply, most notably on the widely used US Crude benchmark.

So are those bullish reversal patterns set to complete at $45/48 as we asked a fortnight ago? Or is $42 the best we are going to see in terms of challenging the long-term downtrend? Is the short squeeze complete? A supply glut, rising US stocks and Opec disagreement are simple enough drivers to appreciate, with plenty of data points and comments to media fuelling volatility. However, don’t forget the currency element with oil – like most commodities – denominated in USD. The USD is already off its 3.5-month dovish Fed-inspired lows of last week. This is thanks to a handful of US monetary policy makers very publicly expressing views which are rather at odds with the dovish stance most recently offered by Fed Chair Yellen. Any more of this and the resulting USD strength could easily serve to push oil back or at the very least hinder further advances.

This commentary was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: https://www.accendomarkets.com.

The oil price follows the market’s heart, not head

This week, Mike van Dulken and Augustin Eden from Accendo Markets tell Hot Commodity why it’s sentiment, not fundamentals, that will boost the oil price.

Equities remain rather sensitive to commodity prices – understandably, given their links to economic growth sentiment. In the oil space we continue to hear mumblings of meetings to discuss production freezes (Moscow next?), yet the probability of any agreement between Opec and Russia is non-existent as long as Opec’s own members fail to agree – Iran and Iraq are still increasing production. Can members trust each other anymore? Has the oil price decline on Saudi-led stubbornness taken things too far in some cases? Is the cartel no more? US production has fallen to a six-month low, helping prices recover to their best levels in many weeks, yet as we have written before, this just risks the US shale frackers rolling back in to make the most of more economically viable prices. They are the new swing producers.

While this remains a distinct possibility, we can’t fail to note some interesting technicals of late that are at odds with some of the fundamentals. US Crude has broken above $36 which could see it on for a double-bottom pattern completing around $45. A price in the mid-$40s makes sense after comments from some US producers about $40 being the new $70, and a $45 figure being cited as enough to encourage some of the nimble drillers back to their rigs. Yet US stockpiles continue to grow to fresh all-time highs. Will today’s data show yet another increase?

Brent Crude, on the other hand, never tested its $28 lows twice and so a double-bottom can’t be on the cards. While there is interesting resistance at $41.30, there is still potential for an inverted head and shoulders reversal to complete at $48 after the breakout at $36. Importantly, if both patterns achieved their objectives this would put paid to major long-term downtrends, getting prices back above what has been bugbear falling resistance since those long gone $100+ highs of summer 2014. It was also maintain the current $3 spread between the two benchmarks.

A major broker may have announced to the world yesterday that the recent surge in commodity prices has gone too far with fundamentals unchanged, exacerbated by short covering, ETF buying and banks vying to distance themselves from bad sector debts. That call may have resulted in a sell-off yesterday. However, markets have already regained poise. After all, fundamentals are one thing, but sentiment is very much another. And hopes of a more favourable message from central banks over the next week or supportive chat from major oil producing nations could easily serve to boost bullishness for the barrel again.

This commentary was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: https://www.accendomarkets.com.

Good news! The US economic revival is definitely on its way

This week, Mike van Dulken and Augustin Eden from Accendo Markets tell Hot Commodity why the US is on the up…even if the rest of the world isn’t.

Equity markets went to town yesterday on positive US data and hopes of more stimulus from the European Central Bank (ECB) and China’s People’s Bank of China (PBoC). Yet this is surely supporting the case for the US Federal Reserve to deliver further interest rate hikes this year – something likely to stifle US growth.

So was the market reaction simply increased confidence in the US economic recovery, coupled with a realistic belief the Fed won’t dare hike this year for fear of a repeat of January’s volatility? This should maintain a nice accommodative tilt to global monetary policy to spur economic recovery elsewhere.

US interest rates have risen only a touch to regain 0.5 per cent and equal the historic lows of its peer across the pond – the UK’s Bank of England (BoE). However, US macro data has blown too hot and cold since then for the Fed’s Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) to be comfortable hiking again anytime soon. Mixed Fed chat of late, with some quite noticeable changes of heart by long-term committee hawks (Bullard), adds to our belief.

With markets already building up to Friday’s US Non-Farm Payroll numbers, it’s worth noting that jobs data has been anything but a worry for the Fed for a good while now, with net monthly additions averaging around 225,000 since 2013. Unemployment at 4.9 per cent remains in a downtrend towards 10 year lows, but wage growth is still lacking.

News that US Q4 2015 GDP growth was revised up to one per cent quarter-on-quarter from 0.4 per cent last week was welcomed by markets, but it still showed a slowdown from previous quarters.

US Consumer Price Inflation (CPI) expectations have also faded quite dramatically (just 1.4 per cent for the next decade, suggestive of another oil price plunge), and sit way below the Fed’s two per cent target. Core CPI figures (excluding food & energy) may have accelerated back to target but for this to hold up oil prices must fall no further, allowing the influence of their 2014 price plunge to dissipate.

So aside from the fact that Friday’s US jobs figures are sure to deliver the traditional monthly market volatility, for us it will only serve to bolster confidence in the US economic revival. Good news. This in turn may further support the case for policy normalisation, but it’s not going to be enough for the Fed to consider the stars truly aligned for another press of the big red button. Even better news for risk appetite. Enjoy the first Friday’s usual fun ‘n’ games, but other data is far more important.

This commentary was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: www.accendomarkets.com.

There are still some gems among Anglo American’s junk heap

This week, Mike van Dulken and Augustin Eden from Accendo Markets mine a little deeper into Anglo American’s “reversification”.

Shares in Anglo American (AAL), a mining giant that’s always had diversity at the centre of its business model, were the worst performing on the FTSE 100 in 2015. Such diversity was key to maintaining profitability in all commodity price conditions, which had been good for so long. But it’s clear that there’s now just one set of conditions: awful. It’s now become necessary to divest and Anglo American is just the latest miner to announce its plan to streamline its exposure. In this case, we’ll see its portfolio reduced to just three products from nine.

High growth emerging markets are, of course, seen as a bellwether for the commodities space as a whole. It’s little surprise that a perceived slowdown in China has dented a steel industry that’s been producing at very high levels for years. Iron ore and coal, the latter also highly out of favour as an energy source, are thus prime candidates to be dropped from a highly diversified miner’s repertoire. Copper, on the other hand, is a commodity that’s able to move with the times, present as it is not just in heavy industry and infrastructure, but also essential in the microelectronics that will dominate any economy that makes the transition from manufacturing and export-led to consumption and services-led.

With precious metals miners clearly benefitting from renewed safe haven demand in early 2016 and a global car industry that’s not only too big to fail (forget about the banks – this one really is), but subject to tighter controls given global warming and a certain car manufacturer’s recent antics, it makes sense to keep producing these products. Furthermore, the luxury goods market may well be oversold at the moment as investors connect slowing EM growth with a corresponding slowdown in the growth of the middle classes in that part of the world.

It’s pretty clear that slowing economic growth – or “continued transition” – needn’t automatically mean people are getting poorer. If anything, the western lifestyle should only pervade emerging markets more as their populations, more exposed to international markets every day, are increasingly freer to strive for material success. So things like diamonds, if you’re lucky enough to be mining them, look good too.

As far as Anglo American is concerned, there are of course positives and negatives in all this. The company is the world’s largest platinum group metals miner and owns DeBeers diamonds. Tick! However, with such a large portfolio of things no one wants (iron ore, coal…) for sale, Anglo finds itself operating in an already oversupplied buyer’s market as it tries to offload them. That, unfortunately, puts a big fat cloud of uncertainty over the company’s efforts. Yet with the entire sector plagued by exactly this type of uncertainty, what’s new?

And with ratings agency Fitch having today downgraded the miner’s credit rating to junk, one might be spooked by the news and worried about the miner’s future. However, its shares remain on a northerly charge from January all-time lows, almost doubling on improved sentiment towards its turnaround strategy, and they haven’t even batted an eyelid at this morning’s downgrade (AAL shares are currently up 7 per cent, near their highs of the day). Post crisis, we all know the ratings agencies are last to the party.

This analysis was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: https://www.accendomarkets.com

The oil price is now hinged on a war of words

In the latest of Accendo Markets‘ regular commentary for Hot Commodity, Mike van Dulken and Augustin Eden give their take on the latest oil price volatility…

Ever since Russia piped up a few weeks back, saying that it was about to sit down with Saudi Arabia to discuss a worldwide five per cent cut in crude production, there have been several instances of other market players trying the same thing, and just a little oil price volatility to boot. Suffice to say, markets quite quickly called this tactic following a swift rebuttal from the leader of the Opec cartel, and perhaps a few more call-outs by some level headed (and perhaps a little cynical) analysts, ourselves included.
 
The latest attempt (by Iran) to buoy the price of oil by talking about production cuts was mostly unsuccessful, although prices did move by about a dollar and, to give credit where credit’s due, held those gains for a few days. So we’re now entering an era where a war of rhetoric is likely the major driver for crude prices, given that the hard fundamentals – a global supply glut and a squabbling group of producer nations – have not changed. We really could be getting to the point whereby the oil price is moving on the breath of whoever happens to mention production cuts on a particular day. Price action is largely dictated by psychology, but when it becomes completely dictated by psychology, there’s a problem.
 
That’s why some big names like the International Energy Agency (IEA) have had to step in to remind us all about the fundamentals. The world is still awash with oil. Such tones, echoed by some of the world’s largest oil traders (who you’d have thought might actually like the price to rise and make them a quick buck or two on their burgeoning stockpiles) yet rebuffed by oil company executives hoping for a return to $100/bbl for so long, are being brought ever closer to the fore in February. The oil execs are now coming round: BP’s Bob Dudley has gone on the wires to tell us that “every oil storage tank will be full by the second half of 2016”. From the CEO of a company that needs oil prices to be higher, it doesn’t get much more bearish than that.
 
Are we finally seeing a sense of realism come back to the oil market after such a tumultuous January? Shale has proven surprisingly resilient to Opec-led tactics of over production and price depression, and it looks as if low interest rates (they’re still low, and going negative) will continue to assist any fracking company to jump into action as soon as the cracks in the crude producing nations’ balance sheets get wider. In a world where carbon emissions dictate the directions of the energy and automobile industries, lower oil prices are here to stay. Sadly for Saudi Arabia, it’s the market that’s king.

This commentary was produced exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: https://www.accendomarkets.com.

Do you agree with Mike and Augustin or do you have a different take on the oil market? Email info@hotcommodity.co.uk with your comments.

Accendo Markets: will the Fed release the doves?

In the first of Accendo Markets‘ regular market commentary for Hot Commodity, Augustin Eden and Mike van Dulken discuss whether the Fed is having cold feet and why gold is good…

This week’s main event is sure to be this evening’s US Federal Reserve policy statement and whether it dares issue some form of dovish mea culpa regarding its December decision to hike, especially given the market turmoil that has greeted us in 2016. While credibility was on the line after such a protracted warm-up, it probably felt obliged to hike rates on US data improvement.

However, it at least has the option to tone down its opening message of 2016 (with no press conference or Q&A) about how many more hikes we might expect this year. From a lofty three, markets are now pricing in one at best. What’s clear is that while the US may have been ready, the global markets were not.

Will the Fed’s focus lie with the US economy’s continued recovery progress or recent financial market volatility? It should be the former, but the latter can’t be ignored. Arguments may dwell on how it was right to move then, but hold now.

Financial markets have neither enjoyed the second half of 2015, nor the tricky start to 2016, but the same needn’t necessarily be said about all asset classes. While equities are hindered by persistent commodity price weakness after an 18-month rout, and a slowing and troubled China, many ask whether the worst is priced in and the doom and gloom overbaked.

So far so gold…

What’s this got to do with the price of gold? Well, it’s having a cracking start to the year, bouncing from 5/6yr lows on talk of output having peaked. Also, as a safe-haven, it needn’t worry about US dollar strength. If people are that fearful (unless they’re Warren Buffett) they’ll probably be yellow-metal bound. The zero-interest bearing asset has seen rising demand from market volatility and technical drivers as well as hopes the Fed will go all dovish on us after December’s ‘mistake’ to raise rates from record lows.

If this does happen, we could well see a pullback in recent USD strength. It’s almost as if the dollar has been simply resting near its 2015 all-time highs, waiting for its next pointer, which could well be revised US monetary policy guidance for 2016. There’ll arguably be a knock-on for the entire commodities sector from that. Even oil could gush a little higher from the FX benefit, despite a more meaningful recovery surely needing moves to cut output and reverse its own supply glut.

This commentary was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by Mike and Augustin at Accendo Markets – https://www.accendomarkets.com.

Do you agree with Mike and Augustin or do you have a different take on the Fed’s next move? Email info@hotcommodity.co.uk with your comments.