Tag Archives: bank of england

The Bank of England’s QE hurdle shows the economy needs more than stimulus

This week, Augustin Eden from Accendo Markets tells Hot Commodity why the Bank of England’s QE troubles show the UK economy needs more than stimulus to boost consumer confidence…

Some awkward moments for the Bank of England over the last couple of days have again hit confidence in the ability of central banks to sort out economies when things turn sour. The UK’s central bank was unable to buy all the gilts (UK government bonds) it wanted when pension funds decided they didn’t want to sell – and why would they? Pension funds are the most risk averse of investors, required to have a virtually guaranteed stream of income to use to pay peoples’ pensions as and when the time comes.

Interest rates on government debt are now being driven towards zero – some shorter dated gilt yields have even dipped negative in the last two days. What will the pension funds do with the cash anyway? They’ll probably try to buy more bonds or even invest in defensive equities, but equities are riskier. Trying to encourage pension funds to take more risk is a dangerous move and, importantly, is something you can’t cloak in the smoke and mirrors of technical jargon. Listen to a central bank press conference and there’s little to be gleaned by those who aren’t versed in economics or market speak, but anyone can work out what it means for pension funds to take more risks – it means their pensions are at risk.

Likewise, everyone can understand what it means when pension funds can’t find the guaranteed income they need. Again, pensions are at risk. A healthy economy does of course depend on business confidence – if there’s plenty of cash in the system and it’s cheap to borrow, then you may as well spend and invest. But business confidence depends on consumer confidence, and I would argue that the latter is more immediate.

This throws up a major issue. If people are worried about their pensions – the one thing they should be able to rely on – then they’re not confident. If quantitative easing and other economic stimulus measures are not increasing consumer confidence then we have a problem. When you look at somewhere like Japan whose government and central bank have been engaged in stimulus activities for years and whose economy is still merely limping along, it could soon be time to start thinking about simply putting money directly into people’s pockets.

This commentary was produced exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: https://www.accendomarkets.com.

Good news! The US economic revival is definitely on its way

This week, Mike van Dulken and Augustin Eden from Accendo Markets tell Hot Commodity why the US is on the up…even if the rest of the world isn’t.

Equity markets went to town yesterday on positive US data and hopes of more stimulus from the European Central Bank (ECB) and China’s People’s Bank of China (PBoC). Yet this is surely supporting the case for the US Federal Reserve to deliver further interest rate hikes this year – something likely to stifle US growth.

So was the market reaction simply increased confidence in the US economic recovery, coupled with a realistic belief the Fed won’t dare hike this year for fear of a repeat of January’s volatility? This should maintain a nice accommodative tilt to global monetary policy to spur economic recovery elsewhere.

US interest rates have risen only a touch to regain 0.5 per cent and equal the historic lows of its peer across the pond – the UK’s Bank of England (BoE). However, US macro data has blown too hot and cold since then for the Fed’s Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) to be comfortable hiking again anytime soon. Mixed Fed chat of late, with some quite noticeable changes of heart by long-term committee hawks (Bullard), adds to our belief.

With markets already building up to Friday’s US Non-Farm Payroll numbers, it’s worth noting that jobs data has been anything but a worry for the Fed for a good while now, with net monthly additions averaging around 225,000 since 2013. Unemployment at 4.9 per cent remains in a downtrend towards 10 year lows, but wage growth is still lacking.

News that US Q4 2015 GDP growth was revised up to one per cent quarter-on-quarter from 0.4 per cent last week was welcomed by markets, but it still showed a slowdown from previous quarters.

US Consumer Price Inflation (CPI) expectations have also faded quite dramatically (just 1.4 per cent for the next decade, suggestive of another oil price plunge), and sit way below the Fed’s two per cent target. Core CPI figures (excluding food & energy) may have accelerated back to target but for this to hold up oil prices must fall no further, allowing the influence of their 2014 price plunge to dissipate.

So aside from the fact that Friday’s US jobs figures are sure to deliver the traditional monthly market volatility, for us it will only serve to bolster confidence in the US economic revival. Good news. This in turn may further support the case for policy normalisation, but it’s not going to be enough for the Fed to consider the stars truly aligned for another press of the big red button. Even better news for risk appetite. Enjoy the first Friday’s usual fun ‘n’ games, but other data is far more important.

This commentary was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: www.accendomarkets.com.

Other people’s money: why the Bank of England needs to raise rates

Legal and General Investment Management’s chief economist has urged the Bank of England to start raising rates, amid fears of an impending consumer debt crisis.

“So many UK customers are on variable rate mortgages – more than in the US,” said Tim Drayson. “I think it’s important to get the process of rate rises underway and normalise it, as the longer you leave it, people will take on more debt…then you’ve got potential for a harder landing.”

“Unsecured credit is starting to get frothy again,” he warned. “There is scope to use macroprudential tools…[but] interest rates is one way of doing this and getting in to all the cracks [of the financial system].”

The Bank of England base rate has remained at 0.5 per cent for more than six years. Doves argue that it should stay this way due to low inflation figures, while hawks say that wage growth and excessive lending need to be addressed.

Drayson said that LGIM is “more hawkish than the market”, although he commented that the UK “is a bit of a wildcard” as its growth depends greatly on whether commodity prices recover or not.

Brent crude is currently lingering at around $43 a barrel, with the $115 of summer 2014 but a distant dream. LGIM attributes the decline to an increase in supply, rather than a slowdown in industrial production in China and the eurozone.