Tag Archives: China growth slowdown

Rio and BHP’s share price rally show the mining recovery is in full swing

This week, Mike van Dulken and Augustin Eden from Accendo Markets explain why bad news can be good news when it comes to mining…

Logistical problems (weather, transport) would normally be considered a negative for a dual-listed mining giant such as BHP Billiton (BLT) or Rio Tinto (RIO). However, trouble getting stuff like the iron ore required to make steel to market in the first quarter of the year has actually proved perversely beneficial to the recovering mining pair.

The news may have impacted recent quarterly financials and resulted in cuts to full-year production guidance, however, prices of the raw material have been buoyed by the interpretation of restricted product supply helping with a slowly reversing global glut. Rather than hurt the companies’ shares, they have maintained their recovery trajectories, even accelerating to make bullish breakouts to levels last seen in October/November. This may serve to attract even more interest, which could prolong the trend.

If I were to tell you that BLT has rallied over 70 per cent from its January lows and RIO by more than 55 per cent, these are exciting moves within the space of three months. Annualise that! Note that their peer Anglo American (AAL) is up 250 per cent from its lows. This is not a typo. It is trading at 780p vs Jan lows of 225p.

No surprise then that commodity prices are well off their lows too, and while the circa 50 per cent oil price recovery has been well documented, and given a depressed commodity sector a boost, it’s the 10-60 per cent rebounds in metals prices (aluminium, copper, nickel, zinc) that have really helped, and iron ore in particular (the winner, up 60 per cent).

This stems from a host of drivers. Tough decisions by the miners included reducing output by abandoning no longer viable projects to stem the supply glut. They have also cut costs and dividends to save money.

A weaker US dollar based on a more gentle normalisation of US monetary policy is also helping by making dollar-denominated commodities that bit cheaper. Short-covering of bearish bets will have added handsomely to early 2016 recovery momentum.

Furthermore, a slower growing China has become more acceptable to the investing masses, the belief being that it is no longer set for a hard landing (the government and central bank will intervene do whatever’s necessary). With China and the rest of the world still requiring mountains of commodities like iron ore for future growth, the outlook is not as bad as it was.

While corporates remain cautious, markets are cautiously optimistic. After the great sell-off we look to be in the midst of a great recovery. The big question now is how far it will run?

This commentary was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: https://www.accendomarkets.com.

There are still some gems among Anglo American’s junk heap

This week, Mike van Dulken and Augustin Eden from Accendo Markets mine a little deeper into Anglo American’s “reversification”.

Shares in Anglo American (AAL), a mining giant that’s always had diversity at the centre of its business model, were the worst performing on the FTSE 100 in 2015. Such diversity was key to maintaining profitability in all commodity price conditions, which had been good for so long. But it’s clear that there’s now just one set of conditions: awful. It’s now become necessary to divest and Anglo American is just the latest miner to announce its plan to streamline its exposure. In this case, we’ll see its portfolio reduced to just three products from nine.

High growth emerging markets are, of course, seen as a bellwether for the commodities space as a whole. It’s little surprise that a perceived slowdown in China has dented a steel industry that’s been producing at very high levels for years. Iron ore and coal, the latter also highly out of favour as an energy source, are thus prime candidates to be dropped from a highly diversified miner’s repertoire. Copper, on the other hand, is a commodity that’s able to move with the times, present as it is not just in heavy industry and infrastructure, but also essential in the microelectronics that will dominate any economy that makes the transition from manufacturing and export-led to consumption and services-led.

With precious metals miners clearly benefitting from renewed safe haven demand in early 2016 and a global car industry that’s not only too big to fail (forget about the banks – this one really is), but subject to tighter controls given global warming and a certain car manufacturer’s recent antics, it makes sense to keep producing these products. Furthermore, the luxury goods market may well be oversold at the moment as investors connect slowing EM growth with a corresponding slowdown in the growth of the middle classes in that part of the world.

It’s pretty clear that slowing economic growth – or “continued transition” – needn’t automatically mean people are getting poorer. If anything, the western lifestyle should only pervade emerging markets more as their populations, more exposed to international markets every day, are increasingly freer to strive for material success. So things like diamonds, if you’re lucky enough to be mining them, look good too.

As far as Anglo American is concerned, there are of course positives and negatives in all this. The company is the world’s largest platinum group metals miner and owns DeBeers diamonds. Tick! However, with such a large portfolio of things no one wants (iron ore, coal…) for sale, Anglo finds itself operating in an already oversupplied buyer’s market as it tries to offload them. That, unfortunately, puts a big fat cloud of uncertainty over the company’s efforts. Yet with the entire sector plagued by exactly this type of uncertainty, what’s new?

And with ratings agency Fitch having today downgraded the miner’s credit rating to junk, one might be spooked by the news and worried about the miner’s future. However, its shares remain on a northerly charge from January all-time lows, almost doubling on improved sentiment towards its turnaround strategy, and they haven’t even batted an eyelid at this morning’s downgrade (AAL shares are currently up 7 per cent, near their highs of the day). Post crisis, we all know the ratings agencies are last to the party.

This analysis was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: https://www.accendomarkets.com

Latest oil price slump shows that black gold has lost its lustre for good

Oil tumbled more than two per cent yesterday, edging perilously close to an 11-year low despite growing fears of World War Three kicking off between Saudi Arabia and Iran.

You’d think that the risk of disrupting supply from two of the world’s largest producers would rattle traders, but no! Late last night you could buy a barrel of brent crude for a little over $36 (£25) – small change compared to the $115 highs of Summer 2014. Prices had trickled down to an 11-year low of $35.98 just before Christmas.

I’ve been bear-ish on oil for quite some time now despite some spikes throughout the year and I still think it could drop to $20 a barrel. But increasingly the market consensus appears to be that oil will rise in the medium term.

The typical view from people I speak to is that Opec (for which read Saudi) will keep production high, which will keep prices low by creating a supply glut. This in turn will cause other producers (for which read the US) to cut their output as they can’t make a profit and eventually this will push prices up as there will be less oil around to meet the demand.

I think this is a far too simplistic a theory.

Firstly, I think the decrease in production, namely from the US, would have to be incredibly dramatic and it would take quite some time to show up due to their mammoth stockpiles of oil. This would be a long term not a medium term effect – and would only work this way if there are no other mitigating factors. I wonder if the hand of government would come into play if the mighty US lost its booming shale industry that was turning it from a net importer to a net exporter of energy?

Secondly, this theory only works if demand stays the same. And here lies the unknown. With growth in China – the world’s largest consumer of commodities – having slipped back into second gear, will there be enough demand to keep oil prices high? The market volatility in China this week shows that no-one really has the faintest idea about what’s going to happen.

Meanwhile in the West, increased energy efficiency measures and investment in renewable power sources mean that oil isn’t the master of the energy market that it once was. There are even predictions that the West’s energy consumption will decrease by the 2030s.

Why does everyone assume that oil prices must, and will, stabilise at a higher price? Surely a lower price could eventually become the new normal and economies would have to adapt or die as a result?

Are you an oil bull or a bear? Email info@hotcommodity.co.uk with your views.

Happy New Year to you all!