Tag Archives: oil supply glut

Sorry investors, the oil glut looks here to stay

FinnCap’s Dougie Youngson tells Hot Commodity why he is sceptical about recent talk of cuts to oil production…

Oil prices ticked up again at the beginning of this week as investors continued to hope that that the current glut of oil production could finally start to fall. Last week Saudi Arabia, Venezuela and Qatar announced they were proposing to freeze production at January’s level. But any deal is dependent on the participation of Iraq and Iran. Both are said to be supportive of the “big freeze”, but have yet to commit to the group. Oil-field-services firm Baker Hughes also said last Friday that the number of rigs drilling for oil in the U.S. fell by 26 last week to 413, down 68% from a peak in October 2014. But in both cases we are looking at freezes on current production levels, not cuts, and these countries will continue to produce above quota.

There is actually a practical reason for not making cuts. Once you shut in a well it can be difficult to bring it back online at the previous levels of performance. Shut in wells rarely return to former production rates, and this is a serious concern given the cuts that are required in order bring production in line with demand. This issue is particularly pronounced in Russia, which can be victim to a more common kind of freeze. Its shut in wells tend to get quickly filled up with water, and come winter this water freezes, which has a devastating effect on both the reservoir and infrastructure.

It’s not just the threat of gammy wells that mean producers are unlikely to shut down production. After all, what incentive does Saudi Arabia really have to reduce production? Why should they help out the rest of the industry? If they can still make a profit at the current oil price then they have little incentive to change. Oil is a finite resource and their oil supplies won’t last forever. So it makes more sense for them to keep production high, so that they can maintain their market share and enhance margins when the oil price does eventually recover.

Ultimately, any resolution on production levels will simply act as a sticking plaster. Key countries may well say they will rein in their overproduction, which is no bad thing. Demand is also forecast to increase by one to two million barrels per day, and this increase could help mop up the overproduction by the end of the year. However, what people say they will do and what will actually happen are two very separate things. The only certainty is that producers will act in their own interests, whatever they may be.

This commentary was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by FinnCap.

Price of brent crude rises after Iran’s oil minister says he supports production freeze

The price of oil has risen after Iran’s oil minister Bijan Zanganeh has said that he supports other producers’ pledges to freeze production – although he didn’t confirm if Iran would follow suit.

Zanganeh said that today’s meeting with his counterparts from Venezuela, Iraq and Qatar was good and that he supports cooperation between Opec and non-Opec producers, according to reports.

He told the oil ministry news service Shana that he supports anything to stabilise the market and that this is the first step, but more steps need to be taken, reported Reuters.

The talks followed yesterday’s meeting in Doha, where Saudi Arabia, Russia, Qatar and Venezuela all pledged to freeze oil output, if other producers participated.

Getting Iran to agree is the tricky part and Zanganeh, while positive about the talks, did not explicitly say whether he would agree to freeze output. Iran only recently had its Western sanctions lifted so is obviously keen to ramp up output and make up for lost time.

The price of a barrel of brent crude was up more than three per cent this afternoon to around $33.

“Asking Iran to freeze its oil production level is illogical … when Iran was under sanctions, some countries raised their output and they caused the drop in oil prices.” Iran’s OPEC envoy, Mehdi Asali, was quoted as saying by the Shargh daily newspaper before the meeting, according to Reuters.

“How can they expect Iran to cooperate now and pay the price?” he said. “We have repeatedly said that Iran will increase its crude output until reaching the pre-sanctions production level.”

Oil prices have been painfully low for the past 18 months, mainly due to Saudi Arabia’s “lower for longer” strategy to try and drive out higher-cost competition.

But the Opec leader’s plan has not been working, which is why it is now trying other ways to boost prices.

The market so far is unconvinced. With the countries pledging to freeze production at near-record levels and Iran not yet on board, it is simply not enough to end the mammoth supply glut.

For more analysis, check out the piece I wrote yesterday for London newspaper City AM:
Saudi-Russian pledge to freeze oil production may be smoke and mirrors

ANALYSIS ON TODAY’S NEWS TO FOLLOW SHORTLY