Tag Archives: Rio Tinto share price

Rio and BHP’s share price rally show the mining recovery is in full swing

This week, Mike van Dulken and Augustin Eden from Accendo Markets explain why bad news can be good news when it comes to mining…

Logistical problems (weather, transport) would normally be considered a negative for a dual-listed mining giant such as BHP Billiton (BLT) or Rio Tinto (RIO). However, trouble getting stuff like the iron ore required to make steel to market in the first quarter of the year has actually proved perversely beneficial to the recovering mining pair.

The news may have impacted recent quarterly financials and resulted in cuts to full-year production guidance, however, prices of the raw material have been buoyed by the interpretation of restricted product supply helping with a slowly reversing global glut. Rather than hurt the companies’ shares, they have maintained their recovery trajectories, even accelerating to make bullish breakouts to levels last seen in October/November. This may serve to attract even more interest, which could prolong the trend.

If I were to tell you that BLT has rallied over 70 per cent from its January lows and RIO by more than 55 per cent, these are exciting moves within the space of three months. Annualise that! Note that their peer Anglo American (AAL) is up 250 per cent from its lows. This is not a typo. It is trading at 780p vs Jan lows of 225p.

No surprise then that commodity prices are well off their lows too, and while the circa 50 per cent oil price recovery has been well documented, and given a depressed commodity sector a boost, it’s the 10-60 per cent rebounds in metals prices (aluminium, copper, nickel, zinc) that have really helped, and iron ore in particular (the winner, up 60 per cent).

This stems from a host of drivers. Tough decisions by the miners included reducing output by abandoning no longer viable projects to stem the supply glut. They have also cut costs and dividends to save money.

A weaker US dollar based on a more gentle normalisation of US monetary policy is also helping by making dollar-denominated commodities that bit cheaper. Short-covering of bearish bets will have added handsomely to early 2016 recovery momentum.

Furthermore, a slower growing China has become more acceptable to the investing masses, the belief being that it is no longer set for a hard landing (the government and central bank will intervene do whatever’s necessary). With China and the rest of the world still requiring mountains of commodities like iron ore for future growth, the outlook is not as bad as it was.

While corporates remain cautious, markets are cautiously optimistic. After the great sell-off we look to be in the midst of a great recovery. The big question now is how far it will run?

This commentary was provided exclusively for Hot Commodity by Accendo Markets: https://www.accendomarkets.com.